Survation Politics, Government & Current Affairs

Survation / Mail on Sunday Attitudes Survey

Summary – Full Data Tables Are Available To Download here;

Our poll for the Mail on Sunday on 25th March revealed that this year’s budget proved very unpopular, and at the height of the various controversies in the days after, we found that an 8-point lead had opened up for Labour.

Two weeks later, the Labour lead has dropped back to 5% (do note the margin of error is just over 3%), however the Conservative vote share has continued to contract to levels not seen since the 1997 general election.

LAB 35% (-4%) CON 30% (-1%) LD 11% (no change) UKIP 11% (+3%) SNP 5% Greens 3%, BNP 1% Plaid 1% Oth 2%

While the budget seems to have been a largely neutral event for the Lib Dems, UKIP appears to be benefiting from some of the disaffection among Conservative voters, with the balance of the contraction of Labour and Conservative support being spread among the smaller parties.

Conservative support has been further dented by the government’s handling of the events (“granny tax”, “pasty tax”, donor dinners, fuel shortage, surveillance powers) of the last two weeks, with 67% of respondents saying events were badly or very badly handled. Only 13% of respondents opted for well or very well.

Conservatives out of touch?

73% of respondents believe the Conservative party is out of touch with ordinary voters (17% in touch).

Respondents believe David Cameron is more concerned by image (61%) than substance (24%) and 52% believe the rich have a disproportionate influence over the Conservative party (36% saying proportionate).

Opinion is divided over Labour’s trade union influence, 44% saying the Trade Unions have a disproportionate influence while 38% say their influence is proportionate.

We’re not all in this together…

When asked whether members of the Government are personally committed to their statement that “we’re all in this together”, an overwhelming 68% do not believe ministers are personally committed (vs. 17% that believe they are).

82% of respondents believe that neither David Cameron, Ed Miliband, George Osborne, Ed Balls or Nick Clegg have had any personal experience of having to “tighten their belts” due to financial constraints. There was little difference in perception between those individuals.

Economic Trust

The public still trust David Cameron (34%) more than Ed Miliband (26%) on the economy, although the fact that 40% don’t know suggests a lack of trust or conviction in both.  George Osborne has slightly improved on this measure (since we asked the question two weeks ago) over Ed Balls 28% to 27%, again though, a high proportion (45%) of respondents not knowing.

 Personalities – Respondents check one or more boxes that they feel describe a politician best.

 

In touch

Competent

Caring

Charismatic

Trustworthy

Sincere

Snobbish

Ed Miliband

13%

14%

13%

3%

12%

16%

10%

David Cameron

11%

24%

11%

17%

12%

14%

40%

George Osborne

6%

19%

4%

4%

9%

8%

33%

Ed Balls

15%

19%

9%

5%

10%

11%

10%

Margaret Thatcher

14%

34%

8%

26%

16%

22%

31%

Tony Blair

12%

20%

8%

32%

7%

10%

18%

Gordon Brown

9%

17%

13%

4%

11%

17%

12%

While George Osborne is seen as out of touch, uncaring and not charismatic, David Cameron’s competence and charisma provides some balance. Both are seen as “snobbish”. Labour’s key issue in capitalising on Conservative weakness appears to be Ball’s and Miliband’s notable lack of charisma to voters (5% and 3% to Cameron’s 17%). Tony Blair is considered to be the most charismatic of all listed (32%) but had the lowest rating on trust (7%).

Perceived as “posh”

Respondents were asked to indicate those politicians they would describe as being “posh”, In order:

Describe as “posh”?

David Cameron

65%

George Osborne

43%

Margaret Thatcher

40%

Nick Clegg

34%

Tony Blair

33%

Ed Miliband

21%

Ed Balls

12%

Gordon Brown

10%

Does being perceived as “posh” matter?

Electorally, yes. While being “posh” made no difference to 62% of respondents, 34% said it would make them less likely to vote for a politician vs. only 4% saying more.

 Who is perceived to be the “most” in touch with ordinary voters?

 Although we would suggest that the lesser known on this list would be less likely to be selected, it is certainly interesting that Etonians Boris Johnson and George Osborne find themselves at opposite ends of the list.

Most in touch with ordinary voters?

Boris Johnson

14%

Ed Miliband

10%

Ed Balls

9%

David Davis

8%

David Cameron

8%

William Hague

6%

Yvette Cooper

5%

Theresa May

2%

George Osborne

1%

Don’t know

37%

Come dine with me?

Whom would voters most and least like to invite to their own houses for dinner?

Although 34% of those asked would not like to invite any politician listed to dinner, the most popular potential dinner guest was Boris Johnson with 22% choosing the mayoral hopeful. Rival in the race for London mayor, Ken Livingstone was the choice of 6% of respondents. George Osborne was bottom of the pack with 1% choosing the chancellor. Cameron edged Miliband 8 % to 5% and despite respondents not rating him on trust, Tony Blair was close behind Cameron with 7%.

Whom would voters most like to invite to their own houses for dinner?

Least Favourite Dinner Guest?

Respondents seemed more certain when picking whom they would least like to be their dinner companion, with only 12% not making a choice. Close at the top, David Cameron pipped Tony Blair and Bradford West by-election winner George Galloway

 

Least Like to Invite to Dinner?

 

David Cameron

18%

Tony Blair

16%

George Galloway

16%

George Osborne

8%

Ken Livingstone

7%

Ed Miliband

7%

Boris Johnson

4%

Nick Clegg

4%

Ed Balls

4%

Theresa May

3%

Yvette Cooper

2%

None of these

12%

 Image

Who would respondents say is or was most concerned about their image?

 

Most Concerned About Their Image?  
Tony Blair

40%

David Cameron

39%

Ed Miliband

8%

Margaret Thatcher

8%

Gordon Brown

6%

A straight fight between Blair and Cameron, with Blair just ahead.

 Events of The Last Two Weeks – Nasty Party?

 47% of respondents said events since the budget had made them more likely to view the Conservative party as “uncaring” (26% of Conservative 2010 voters) (vs. 5% “caring and 43% “no change).

 What are the “main” parties for?

Who do you think each of the main parties works most in the interests of?
 
 

For the many

For the few

Don’t know

Labour

44%

37%

19%

Conservatives

20%

66%

14%

Liberal Democrats

27%

44%

30%

Inner Circles?

What do you think counts for more in the inner circle of each of the following?

 

 

What you know

Who you know

Don’t know

David Cameron

21%

64%

15%

Ed Miliband

30%

42%

27%

Nick Clegg

25%

45%

30%

 

The “Real” David Cameron?

 With respondents in this poll viewing David Cameron as highly image conscious, of two pictures presented to them, which best represented the “real” David Cameron

63% selected the frock-coated David Cameron in the well-known Bullingdon club photograph.

37% selected the image of Cameron in casual clothes drinking a pint of beer in a pub.

Socially elite “chums”?

 

 And finally… Ed Balls tops a question;

 “Which politician do you think would drive the best bargain when purchasing an item at a car boot sale? -Either Balls is considered the best negotiator or possibly the most likely to ‘be’ at a boot sale?

Ed Balls

26%

George Osborne

13%

Ed Miliband

9%

David Cameron

8%

Nick Clegg

7%

Don’t Know

37%

Survation interviewed 1,036 people online between April 5th abd 6th. Data were weighted to be representative of the UK public.

Sign-up to the Survation Consumer Panel and share your views with the nation here;

Survation are a member of The British Polling Council and abide by its rules

http://www.britishpollingcouncil.org

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